Fr. Tyson grew up in a Lutheran family on Luther’s Small Catechism. As a teenager, he began to question such Protestant pillars as “sola Scriptura” and the equating of concupiscence with personal sin.  He thought to himself, if we can’t cooperate with God, because of total depravity, what it the purpose of living a moral Christian life? He felt called to ministry but joined the military out of hight school. Later he attended college and then a Lutheran seminary. His last year in seminary he became an ecumenical office and attended the Pontifical Seminary Josephinum. After seminary he was ordained a Lutheran minister and pastored in Ohio. During this time the pull of the Holy Spirit toward the Catholic Church continued. The more research he did the more he became convinced of the truth of the Catholic Church. He finally was received into the Catholic Church and later ordained a Catholic priest. Fr. Tyson is now an Army chaplain.

  • reddog44

    Why someone would leave his historical church for one not solidly built on authentic tradition and scripture is a baffling conundrum indeed. Sheep stealing is nothing to be proud of and should indeed be shunned, or at the least kept silent.

  • Richard Scott, OFS

    I had the good fortune to meet Fr. Wood while he was still in seminary. The Archdiocese of Baltimore assigned him the task of teaching a class on the New Testament. His Army career was much more interesting than Marcus had time to explore (we had eight weeks).

    The photo below was from this class. I learned a lot from him and deeply respect him. Some of the finest men I have ever met were Military Chaplains in both the Army and the Navy, one of whom had a ship named after him.